mucholderthen:

Safer Storage for Nuclear Waste
Nuclear waste is piling up in our backyard—and it’s not stored as safely as it could be.

FROM  Union of Concerned Scientists

(via dendroica)

nuclearvault:

Grable test footage

(Source: kim-jong-chill)

jonkakes:

bigcoolscorner:

merauderdon:

givemeinternet:

As close as you will ever be to a nuclear explosion

THIS IS FUCKING TERRIFYING

No thank you.

The columns of smoke in the foreground are telephone poles boiling

jonkakes:

bigcoolscorner:

merauderdon:

givemeinternet:

As close as you will ever be to a nuclear explosion

THIS IS FUCKING TERRIFYING

No thank you.

The columns of smoke in the foreground are telephone poles boiling

(via buckrogersinthe21stcentury)

nuclearvault:

"Given the remarkable developments in nuclear technology in the 1950s and 1960s, it is only natural that consideration would be directed toward the development of a nuclear-powered pacemaker."

The Rise and Fall of the Nuclear Pacemaker

exclusionzonebird:

Chernobyl nuclear power plant before the disaster of 1986.
Photographer and source unknown.

exclusionzonebird:

Chernobyl nuclear power plant before the disaster of 1986.

Photographer and source unknown.

(Source: permanentdreaming, via thenuclearblog)

nuclearvault:

"In the spring of 1955, as the Cold War intensified and the arms race between the United States and the Soviet Union escalated at a shocking pace, America — as it had many times before — detonated an atomic weapon in the Nevada desert. The test was not especially noteworthy. The weapon’s yield was not dramatically larger or smaller than that of previous A-bombs. The brighter-than-the-sun flash of light, the mushroom cloud and the staggering power unleashed by the weapon were all byproducts familiar to anyone who had either witnessed or paid attention to coverage of earlier tests.

And yet today, six decades later, at a time when the prospect of nuclear tests by “rogue states” like North Korea and Iran is once again making headlines and driving international negotiations and debate, the very banality of one long-forgotten atomic test in 1955 feels somehow more chilling than other more memorable or era-defining episodes from the Cold War. After all, whether conducted in the name of deterrence, defense or pure scientific research, the May 1955 blast was in a very real sense routine.

This is not to suggest that the scientists, engineers and other professionals involved at Yucca Flat were somehow cavalier about detonating atomic weapons. But it’s worth remembering that, in the first half of 1955, the U.S. conducted more than a dozen nuclear test explosions in Nevada alone. After a while, the mushroom clouds from these tests, visible from Las Vegas 60 miles away, had become tourist draws. One needn’t be a pacifist, an anti-nuclear crusader or a modern-day Luddite to shudder at the thought of nuclear explosion after nuclear explosion after nuclear explosion — and the lethal aftermath of what such explosions entail — ripping through the dry desert air of the starkly gorgeous American southwest.

Made in the Nevada desert by photographer Loomis Dean shortly after a 1955 atomic bomb test, these are not “political” pictures. They are eerily beautiful, unsettling photographs made at the height of the Cold War, when the destructive power of the detonation was jaw-droppingly huge — but positively miniscule compared to today’s truly terrifying thermonuclear weapons. As LIFE told its readers in its 16 May 1955 issue:

A day after the 44th nuclear test explosion in the U.S. rent the still Nevada air, observers cautiously inspected department store mannequins which were poised disheveled but still haughty on the sand sand in the homes of Yucca Flat. The figures were residents of an entire million-dollar village built to test the effects of an atomic blast on everything from houses to clothes to canned soup.

The condition of the figures — one charred, another only scorched, another almost untouched — showed that the blast, equivalent to 35,00 tons of TNT, was discriminating in its effects. As one phase of the atomic test, the village and figures help guide civil defense planning — and make clear that even amid atomic holocaust careful planning could save lives.

There is, in such words and in such sentiments, an almost unrecognizable optimism  it’s tempting to say, an innocence that is no longer available to us when it comes to honest discussions of, as LIFE put it, “atomic holocaust.” With conversations about nuclear tests (both theoretical and real) so very much in the news these days, these pictures from more than half a century ago might serve as a quiet reminder of just how horrific and insane the very notion of nuclear warfare really is.”

[Nevada Ghosts: LIFE at an A-Bomb Test, 1955]

(via gabe-of-thrones)

scienceisbeauty:

This graphic shows the secondary process by which XFEL light can drive the energy release from a sample containing a nuclear isomer. In the first step (top), photons knock electrons out of inner atomic shells. leading to a plasma of free electrons and ionized atoms. This interaction does not directly affect the nucleus, as it remains in the metastable isomeric state (top right). However, when electrons from the plasma are later captured in the inner-shell vacancies, their excess energy can excite the nucleus to a higher, but less stable, energy state (middle). In the last step, the nucleus relaxes to its ground state, releasing photons in a cascade (bottom).
Source: Free-Electron Lasers Trigger Nuclear Transitions (American Physical Society)
Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 082501 (2014)

scienceisbeauty:

This graphic shows the secondary process by which XFEL light can drive the energy release from a sample containing a nuclear isomer. In the first step (top), photons knock electrons out of inner atomic shells. leading to a plasma of free electrons and ionized atoms. This interaction does not directly affect the nucleus, as it remains in the metastable isomeric state (top right). However, when electrons from the plasma are later captured in the inner-shell vacancies, their excess energy can excite the nucleus to a higher, but less stable, energy state (middle). In the last step, the nucleus relaxes to its ground state, releasing photons in a cascade (bottom).

Source: Free-Electron Lasers Trigger Nuclear Transitions (American Physical Society)

Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 082501 (2014)

ecowatchorg:

msnbc:

Don’t drink the water, don’t eat the fish, don’t breathe the ash.Check out the restrictions on residents across the country after chemical and oil spills in their backyards.More: http://onmsnbc.co/pwreou 

of note.

ecowatchorg:

msnbc:

Don’t drink the water, don’t eat the fish, don’t breathe the ash.

Check out the restrictions on residents across the country after chemical and oil spills in their backyards.

More: http://onmsnbc.co/pwreou 

of note.

nuclearvault:

Pickering Nuclear Generating Station (Ontario Power Generation)Pickering, Ontario, Canada

nuclearvault:

Pickering Nuclear Generating Station (Ontario Power Generation)
Pickering, Ontario, Canada

(via thenuclearblog)

Watch now: PBS NewsHour | Fukushima nuclear crisis continues to unfold | PBS Video

cheeseandjackers:

The voice of Portal’s maniacal GLaDOS, Ellen McLain helped with this video fro the education and public outreach department of NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope, focusing on STEM education.

(Source: ambition-exceeds-skill)

nowyoukno:

Now You Know (Source)

How Nowhere Became Somewhere

zenithpress:

nuclear_testing_Area_51

Source: NNSA/NSO/Area 51—Black Jets

Military personnel casually observe a 22-kiloton blast at Frenchman Flat in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site on April 15, 1955.

In October 1940, President Franklin Roosevelt signed off on the idea of turning more than three million…

ecowatchorg:

How a German Village Created an Independent Grid and a Renewable Energy Future 
READ MORE on EcoWatch: http://ecowatch.com/2014/02/20/german-village-independent-grid-renewable-energy-future/ 

ecowatchorg:

How a German Village Created an Independent Grid and a Renewable Energy Future 

READ MORE on EcoWatch: http://ecowatch.com/2014/02/20/german-village-independent-grid-renewable-energy-future/ 

oldshowbiz:

A Good Name for a Movie.

oldshowbiz:

A Good Name for a Movie.

(via buckrogersinthe21stcentury)